Tuesday, January 09, 2007

It's Miller Time!

From the homepage of Representative George Miller (D-CA):

"The Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007, H.R. 2, will raise the minimum wage from $5.15 per hour to $7.25 per hour in three increments over two years and two months. It will also extend the minimum wage, on a separate timetable, to the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, a U.S. territory in the Pacific Oceans where labor abuses have been rampant."
The press release states that the House is scheduled to vote on this legislation, called The Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007, H.R. 2, on Wednesday, January 10.

I prefer to call it the No Labor Union Left Behind Act...or just simply the No Garment Factory Left in the CNMI Act.

1 comment:

brad said...

Angelo schmangelo,
I loved the link to Rep. Miller's site so much that I sent his writer's an email. Yay me.
Brad

Hello you two,
I live in the CNMI and have seen much more in the way of labor rules and enforcement than your average mainlander. My question is regarding this section of your press release:

The Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007, H.R. 2, will raise the minimum wage from $5.15 per hour to $7.25 per hour in three increments over two years and two months. It will also extend the minimum wage, on a separate timetable, to the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, a U.S. territory in the Pacific Oceans where labor abuses have been rampant.

Your chosen style of writing in this instance implies the press release is the perspective of someone who claims to be an expert on the subject of labor violations specific to the CNMI and that said labor abuses are generally accepted as fact.

I beg to differ on both accounts. As government employees with college educations you should have known better.

How many times has Rep. Miller been to the CNMI?
How many labor abuses qualify the use of the word "rampant?"
Where exactly did said abuses take place? On Saipan? On Tinian? On Rota? All of the above?
What is Rep. Miller's stance on the U.S. government's proposed federalization of the CNMI's current domain over immigration?
While it would appear to citizens on the mainland that the CNMI is a U.S. possession, residents of Saipan, Tinian and Rota believe themselves to be an independent sovereignty sharing a close affiliation with the United States. The covenant signed by former President Ford included protection to this point that would be nullified if the CNMI loses control over its immigration policies. Does Rep. Miller believe that the covenant should be scrapped? What would he do should the people of the CNMI wish to sever the ties to its longtime ally and sign a similar association with a rising competing power in Asia--say China?

I look forward to your reply.

Sincerely,
Brad E. Ruszala



I'm suck a muckracker. Eh, I'm just curious to see what the response will be.
Brad